Spondylolisthesis is a medical condition that occurs when one of the backbones ‘the vertebra’ slides forward over the bone below it. It often occurs in the lower spine ‘the lumbosacral.’ This may prompt the spinal cord or nerve roots to squeeze. This can cause back pains and weakness or numbness in one or both legs. In some cases, it can cause loss of control over your bowel and bladder. When a vertebra slips out of position, there might be no symptoms or side effects at first, until a later date. At that point, you may have pains in your low back or butt cheek. Muscles in your leg may feel tight or feeble. You may even limp.

The spinal bones in your body come together at some joints that keep the bones arranged while enabling them to move. Spondylolisthesis is as a result of an issue with at least one of these little joints that enables one bone to slip out of place. Spondylolisthesis affects teenagers and kids associated with sports. Several games like vaulting or weight lifting can abuse spines to the point of causing pressure breaks in vertebrae, which can bring about spondylolisthesis. Adults can experience spondylolisthesis, due to wear and tear of the back bone which prompts pressure breaks. It can likewise happen without pressure cracks when the joints are exhausted and slip out of position.

Treatment for spondylolisthesis begins with stopping any physical activity that may have led to vertebrae damage. Doctors frequently propose physical therapy to develop muscles of the stomach and back muscles. For overweight individuals, weight reduction may likewise help. At the point when the pain is outrageous, or bones keep on moving, or if there is nerve root or spinal rope harm identified with the spondylolisthesis, surgery can now take place. Surgery might be done for the bone to be removed or other tissue to take the weight off the spinal line or nerves. Or then again surgery might be done to intertwine the bones in position. Both surgeries are similar. After any of these surgeries, you may need to wear a cast or back support for some time. Afterward, physical therapy will help make your muscles stronger and the pain gone, so you can now walk freely.